Tue. Jan 18th, 2022
Are-Silver-and-Gold-Bullion-a-Good-Investment-Are-Collectible-Coins

By admin

4 thoughts on “Are Silver and Gold Bullion a Good Investment? Are Collectible Coins?”
    1. Boy that sure complicates things! I actually work in real estate lending. It’s one of the most complex business models to explain. You have 3 growth streams, from the asset value, to the rent income, and also the depreciation of the asset on tax tables. It’s impossible to nail down, because it varies from neighborhood to neighborhood, asset type to asset type, and whether you are managing your own properties, paying for them to be managed, or simply investing in a REIT of some kind. It’s like a multi-layered onion cake trying to unpack that one!

  1. Coin collecting is a hobby. Silver and Gold are just wealth preservation, and you could lump Coin collecting into this as well. If you invested in the metals and caught the 7 highs and lows, playing the GSR (Gold to Silver Ratio) plays, then you would have made the S&P investment look like a nickel and dime trade. The problem for the past couple of decades, is that very few have done any investment or done any kind of collections. Therefore, they have nothing of wealth to pass down to the next generations. Look around today, most are living in the “I got to have it now” mindset, with no regard for their future. In most cases, when there is a death in the family, all anyone see’s is $$$$ signs, and ask “How much do I get”.

    1. I don’t disagree with what you are saying, but I will gently push back and suggest that if you catch S&P Highs & Lows, you also could make buying & holding the S&P look like nickel and dime. But for this thought experiment I wanted to demonstrate what performance looked like for buying & holding across these products. Trading is a whole ‘nother animal, not for the emotional or faint of heart, and requires some luck.
      I 100% agree with what you are saying about saving & investing generally across the population. The average person makes no plans for the future, and they look up at age 55 and realize, “oh crap, I wanted to retire at 65” and have absolutely no reasonable means for that to happen.
      We are in a consumption based economy for sure! So the rare few who even bother to invest usually come out the winners. Even if the investments weren’t the “best of the best” or perfectly timed, or traded. Those who do “something” are a different breed than the instant gratification crowd who are in for a lot of pain.

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